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Resume & CV Resources

Brainstorm Experience

The purpose of your resume is to get an interview. In thirty seconds or less, most employers decide whether or not to consider applicants for employment, so your resume's content must be CLEAR, CONCISE, and COMPELLING.

Begin the resume writing process by jotting down every position or experience you've had. Here's a nice list of example experiences to help you brainstorm:

  • Organizations to which you've belonged
  • Leadership positions
  • Volunteer experiences
  • Special class projects
  • Awards
  • Languages you speak
  • Computer skills
  • Special interests or hobbies
  • Travel/study abroad
  • Anything else significant

keep in mind: Not all of your experiences are likely to be included in your final version, but a running list can help you craft and tailor a resume for any opportunity.

 

Then, break down each position you held into the core 4:

THE CORE 4Example #1Example #2Example #3
Company Name Mochas & Javas Purdue Science Student Council Silver Cross Hospital
Position Held Barista Treasurer Volunteer
Month/Year of Start & Finish January 2011 - May 2013 January 2013 - December 2013 May 2010 - August 2010
City & State/Country Austin, TX West Lafayette, IN Joliet, IN

 

CREATE TRANSFERABLE SKILLS 

Now that you have listed your experiences, begin contemplating the TRANSFERABLE SKILLS you gained. Doing so will give you an idea of how the skills you obtained will make you competitive for future opportunities.  

Common TRANSFERABLE SKILLS employers are looking for include:

  • Communication
  • Critical thinking
  • Creativity
  • Organization
  • Decision making
  • Adaptability
  • Thinking ahead
  • Calculating numbers
  • Quick Learner
  • Confidence
  • Energetic
  • Helpfulness
  • Trustworthiness
  • Efficiency
  • Listening
  • Dependability
  • Flexibility
  • Time management
  • Trouble-shooting
  • Punctuality
  • Loyalty
  • Precision
  • Resourcefulness
  • Leadership
  • Analysis
  • Customer service
  • Motivating others

 

WHAT IS THE NEXT STEP? 

Take one of your experiences, list the TASKS you performed in that job and identify which TRANSFERABLE SKILLS might line up with those tasks. For example, if you were a barista, your task and transferable skills list might look something like this: 

TASKSTRANSFERABLE SKILLS
Took money and gave change back to customers, deposited the day’s earnings in bank, closed out a day’s paperwork Calculate numbers, dependability
Wiped tables, cleaned up after customers at end of shift Efficiency
Opened store at 5:30 a.m., finished daily duties before end of shift Punctuality, time management
Worked well with co-workers, trained new employees Leadership, communication, helpfulness
Listened to customer orders and concerns, made quick decisions, got drinks out in a timely manner even though it was really busy, memorized multiple menu items Customer service, listening, decision making, precision

 

Now you have the ingredients to MAKE A STRONG BULLET POINT

MAKE A STRONG BULLET POINT

Now it’s time to incorporate those TASKS and TRANSFERABLE SKILLS you gained into strong bullet points for your resume by implementing the following formula:

 

POWER VERB + TASK +

PURPOSE (why did you do the task?),

METHOD (how did you go about doing the task?), or

RESULT (what happened because you did it?)

 

HINT:  You can include a combination of two of these add on items (for example: purpose and method) in a bullet point. You can even include all three (purpose, method and result) if you are able to! 

 

HOW CAN THIS FORMULA BE IMPLEMENTED?

 

PURPOSE

  • Observed and analyzed students’ behavior in order to guide successful classroom instruction
  • Performed gear mapping for transmissions to optimize shift patters, fuel economy and available power 
  • Collaborated with Purdue faculty to increase cultural self-education amongst minority students

 

METHOD

  • Ensured customer satisfaction by listening to orders and delivering product that fulfilled customer specifications
  • Collected quantitative infrared imaging using a high speed infrared camera

 

RESULT

  • Developed new ideas for Exelon’s eFin website which increased traffic flow by 20%
  • Performed internal audits on 159 underwriting cases in 3 weeks improving efficiency according to the Audit Board
  • Designed and implemented latches for condensation vents to reduce water leakage creating a safer work environment

WHAT IS A POWER VERB?

action verbs

handbook iconCheck out the CCO Handbook for more power verbs

FIRST DRAFT, FIRST STEPS

Decide the RESUME TYPE you prefer to use, based on the message you want to portray to employers:

 

Chronological:

  • Highlights information in reverse chronological order from most recent to oldest
  • Most commonly used format 
  • Make the most of this resume type by prioritizing your sections, so you can highlight your most relevant experience first! 

Functional:

  • Highlights information in categories based on commonly grouped skills
  • Useful for those with a wide variety of work history, gaps in experience, or those seeking to change career fields

View the CCO Handbook for functional resume examples

 

FORMAT PROFESSIONALLY

  • Margins: Top-0.8”-1”; Sides and bottom-0.5”-1”
  • Font Size & Style: 10-12 and simple, readable fonts (Calibri, Georgia, Arial, Cambria, Times New Roman)
  • Length: Undergraduate level-1 page; Graduate & PhD-2 pages or more; Education, Nursing and Medicine can have more than 1 page
  • Templates: Refrain from using them!
  • Order: Heading, objective (if included) and education are first, in that order
  • No Pronouns: Do not use first-person pronouns (I, me, my) 
  • Don't get Personal: Refrain from incorporating personal information like your age, gender, religion, political affiliation, marital status, ethnicity , visa status or photographs

Resume Rotation

Before crafting the sections of your resume, learn the guidelines that pertain to each section and view examples on how the rules can by applied by exploring the resume rotation tool below.


  • headline

    Include your name, current address, email and home or cell number. You may wish to include your home address, but this is optional. The URL for a personal homepage is optional.

  • Elizabeth Eatery

    567 S. Salisbury St, Apt 25eatery@purdue.edu
    West Lafayette, IN 47906(123) 456 - 7890

  • Maya Management

    (765)727-8243 • mayamanagement@purdue.edu

    103 Krannert Road • Lafayette, IN 47907

  • objective

    This is an optional statement that focuses on the internship or job for which you are applying.

  • Objective

    Seeking full-time Research and Development or Quality Scientist position in the field of Food Science

  • Objective

    To obtain a full-time finance position in international business

  • education

    This section covers your educational institutions, degrees and dates. Include the offical name of your degree, as well as any minors or concentrations. You can also include your overall or major GPA. Omit your high school education.

  • Education

    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN May 2013

    Bachelor of Science in Food Science

    Minor: Organization Leadership and Supervision (OLS)

  • Education

    Purdue University, Krannert School of Management, West Lafayette, IN Major Gpa: 3.5/4

    Bachelor of Science in Business Management, Concentration in Finance May 2012

  • experience sections

    These sections may include all of your experiences, paid and unpaid. Analyze each of your experiences with regards to the skills and accomplishments gained. Quantify the statements, where possible, and use action verbs. Refer to the make a strong bullet point tab for more help on this

    Make sure to include the core 4 for each experience:

    1. Company Name
    2. Position Held
    3. Month/Year of start & finish
    4. City and State

     

    own this part of your resume

    This is where your unique experience gets to shine. Take control of your experience sections and put your most relevant categories first. Is your volunteer experience or the class project work you have done most relevant to the position you are applying for? Then put those sections higher on your resume.

    Here are some sections you can include in your resume:

    • Professional Experience
    • Relevant Coursework
    • Study Abroad
    • Certifications or Licensures
    • Leadership Experience
    • Student Organizations
    • Volunteer Experience
    • Professional Affiliations
    • Notable Projects or Class Projects
    • Research Experience
    • Teaching Experience
    • Publications
    • Presentations
  • Professional Experience

    Eli Lilly Company, Manufacture & Quality Intern, Indianapolis, IN May 2012 - August 2012

    • Collaborated with team members to identify factors that influence measurement visibility of pH
    • Researched, designed, and performed a screening design to examine the factors of pH measurement variability using insulin, pH meters and water baths
    • Proposed solutions to improve CpK values in Lilly's current insulin manufacturing processes
    • Wrote technical reports on pH measure variability
    • Managed a team of 10 interns in 2 projects for volunteer service around the community
    CVS Pharmacy, Intern, Indianapolis, INMay 2009 - September 2009
    • Successfully managed pharmacy with a staff of 6 to prepare prescriptions
    • Researched, managed, and ordered pharmacy inventory
    • Resolved insurance problems for customers through knowledge of procedures
    Research Experience
    Purdue Research Assistant, Dept of Food Science, West Lafayette, INSeptember 2011 - Present
    • Develop new products consisting of Asian Carp for consumers and market consumption
    • Analyze microorganism's data and conduct proximal analysis accordingly to improve product
    • Collect data and prepare fish chorzio samples for sensory panel and analysis
    • Mentor undergraduate research assistant to acquire laboratory skills
    IUPUI Research Assistant, Dept of Biology, Indianapolis, IN May 2011 - August 2011
    • Evaluated 384-lunasin soy-peptides to enhance anti-tumor immunity of natural killer cells
    • Acquired data from cancer patients' natural killer cells to examine effectiveness of chemo drugs
    • Enhanced laboratory experience with SDS-page and Western Blotting Methods
  • Professional Experience

    Exelon Corporation, Chicago, IL

    Finance Intern June 2010 - August 2010

    • Developed new ideas for Exelon's eFin website which increased web traffic flow by 20%
    • Increased file organization efficiency using Sharepoint and reported progress using Hyperion
    • Organized and calculated the facilites' budget for 2010 - 2014 long-range planning

    General Motors Corporation, Pontiac, MI

    Finance Intern May 2009 - August 2009

    • Proposed potential improvements and innovative solutions to GM's current alternate propulsion strategy on hybrids and other green technologies in a case competition
    • Streamlined the overtime process resulting in improved efficiency
    • Audited Business Plan Deployment (BPD) boards and provided results within three days to ensure goals were met
    Leadership Experience

    Society of Minority Managers (SMM)

    Vice President of Finance August 2008 - Present

    • Raised $3000 for the club through 3 successful, summer events
    • Collaborated with E-board to produce 1st annual networking reception
    • Managed the account balance by reconciling each month, organizing, and filing critical financial documents

    Center for Career Opportunities (CCO)

    Student Ambassador August 2008 - May 2009

    • Designed model diagram for the CCO used in assisting students to understand their career development
    • Critiqued resumes and cover letters for Purdue students both during walk in hours and after presentations
    • Created awareness of the CCO services and benefits to the student body by giving presentations
  • awards or honors

    This section is optional, and usually not included unless you have earned prestigious awards relevant to the position.

    skills

    These may include laboratory skills, foreign language ability, computer skills and others

  • Language Skills

    Vietnamese, Spanish

    Licensure

    Pharmacy Technician, State of Indiana, 67016873A

  • Honors
    • EverBan Citation of Academic Excellence and Leadership Excellence Recipient 2011
    • Black Caucus Academic Award 2009 - 2011
    • Mortar Board Leadership Conference 2010
    • US Steel Business Opportunity Program Scholarship 2008

EDIT & PROOFREAD

  • Organize your experience sections so that your most relevant experience Is listed towards the top of your resume.
  • Don’t include your references or a “References available upon request” statement on your resume. Remember that the purpose of your resume is to get an interview and an employer typically asks for references during or after an interview. 
  • Take out your high school education and experience unless it directly relates to the position you’re applying for. 
  • Visit the CCO in Young Hall, Rm 132 for a RESUME CRITIQUE during Drop-Ins from 10-4, Monday– Friday! 

 

handbook iconCheck out the CCO Handbook for more resume tips and examples

cv rotation

The Curriculum Vitae (CV) is used to market your scholarly background for PhD level positions, research opportunities or graduate school admission. While the sections of the CV are similar to a resume, the CV can be more than 1 page. Before crafting the sections of your CV, learn the guidelines that pertain to each section and view examples on how the rules can by applied by exploring the CV ROTATION tool below.

keep in mind: CV sections can vary widely based on which field you're in (for example, a biology and literature CV may have different formats).

Common CV Sections:

  • Name and Contact Information
  • Education
  • Experience (Research, Teaching, Other)
  • Publications and Presentations

Optional Sections:

  • Honors or Awards (Fellowships, Grants, etc.)
  • Research and/or Teaching Interests
  • Professional Associations
  • Skills
  • headline

    Include your name, current address, email and home or cell number. The URL for a personal homepage is optional.

  • Corey Vitae

    543 Ferry St. Apt. 2765-494-1234
    Lafayette, IN 47901corey@purdue.edu

  • Catherine Clarkson

    898 4th Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907 • 765.368.3333 • cclark@purdue.edu • catherine.wordpress.com

  • objective

    This is an optional statement that focuses on the job for which you’re applying.

  • Objective

    To obtain a full-time position with a medical device R&D group to engineer innovative solutions for chronic medical disorders

  • Objective

    To become a Professor of English at Texas State University

  • education

    This section covers your educational institutions, degrees and dates listed in reverse chronological order.

     

    Include:
    • Official name of your degree, as well as if you have any minors or certifications
    • Master's thesis, project and/or dissertation title(s)
    • Name of advisor
  • Education

    Ph.D., Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8/2010

    Thesis: Enhancing the neural faces of polyester (3-4-ethylene dioxythiophene)

    Advisor: Dr. Smith Travis

    B.S., Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 5/2007

    Minor in Psychology

    GPA: 3.5/4.0

  • Education

    Ph.D. in Literature Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, May 2018

    M.A. in English Literature Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas, May 2011

    with Distinction Thesis Title: "You Know Nothing of My Work:
    Reading and Misreading Woody Allen and Phillip Roth"
    Thesis Advisor: Don Wilbur



    B.A. in English Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas, May 2009

    3.8/4.0 Major GPA

  • professional experience

    Divide your professional experience into categories that are most relevant for the position you’re applying for. For example, if you’re applying for a research position, “Research Experience” should be its own section. Here’s a sample listing of the different professional experience sections you could include in your CV:

    • Teaching Experience
    • Research Experience
    • Consulting
    • Fieldwork
    • Postdoctoral Work
    • Internships
    • Volunteer Experience
    • Leadership Experience

    Analyze each of your experiences with regards to the skills, abilities and accomplishments gained. Quantify the statements when possible, and use action verbs. Refer to the make a strong bullet point tab for more help on this.


    Make sure to include the core 4 for each experience:

    1. Company Name
    2. Position Held
    3. Month/Year of start & finish
    4. City and State

     

    own this part of your CV. This is where your unique experience gets to shine. Take control of the order of your professional experience sections and put your most relevant categories first.

  • Research Experience

    Research Assistant, NeuroProstheses Research Laboratory (Advisor: Dr. Kevin Otto), Purdue University 1/2007 - Present

    PEDOT coatings for micro-neurostimulation

    • Cooperated with conductive polymer company, Biotectix, LCC, on applying the conductive polymer PEDOT to extend the lifetime of intracortical microstimulation prostheses
    • Assessed long-term PEDOT coating performance in behaving animals through impedance, electrophysiology, behavioral thresholds, and histology

    In vivo PEDOT polymerization

    • Formed an integrated neural interface within tissue through in vivo polymerization techniques
    • Evaluated in vivo polymerized neural interface through impedance, electrophysiology, and histology

    Undergraduate Research Fellow, NeuroProstheses Research Laboratory, Purdue University 1/2006 - 12/2007

    • Took lead in setting up new lab, and built hardware and software for electrochemical assessment
    • Developed techniques on improving the long-term functionality of intracortical prostheses

    Hospital Intern, Biomedical Department, Porter Hospital, Valparaiso, IN Summer 2005

    • Repaired/calibrated hospital equipment including infusion pumps, pulse oximeters and compression pumps
    • Collaborated with biomedical technician staff in ordering, maintaining and upgrading medical equipment
  • Teaching Experience

    Purdue University Teaching Assistant, West Lafayette, IN, August 2012-Present

    • Currently teaching fourth section of English 106 with “Documenting Realities” syllabus approach
    • Discuss with individual students how they can best revise their papers and improve their writing
    • Include a research unit requiring precise MLA style and documentation
    • Instructor Evaluation Average of 4.4/5.0

    O. Henry Middle School Temporary 504 Coordinator, Austin, TX, February 2012-May 2012

    • Ensured 504 plans were implemented with fidelity inside and outside of classrooms
    • Updated, reviewed, and distributed Section 504 materials
    • Facilitated Special Education inclusion in a variety of classes

    Hays CISD Substitute Teacher, Kyle, TX, August 2011-December 2011

    • Implemented a wide range of lesson plans in secondary school classrooms

    Alternative Texas Certification through Texas Teachers to Teach Secondary Education

    • Acquired 47 hours of face-to-face training and 13 online sessions

    Student Learning Assistance Center Verbal, History & French Tutor, San Marcos, TX, Dec. 2009-Aug. 2011

    • Counseled students on writing strategies and techniques in English, History and French
    • Prepared students for the Grammar, Spelling and Punctuation Test
    • Collaborated with non-native English speakers to improve language skills
    • Earned Master Level Certification from College Reading and Learning Association
  • Publications

    List your publications, making sure you apply the appropriate citation format for your field.

     

    If your paper has been submitted, but not approved for publication, indicate it as “Submitted for Publication.” If your paper was accepted for publication, but has not yet been published, indicate it as “Forthcoming.”

  • Publications

    Vitae, CR, Richardson-Burns, JL Hendricks, DC Martin, and KJ Otto. Poly(3-4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as a micro- neural interface material for electrostimulation. Frontiers in Neuroengineering 2:7. 2009.

    Vitae, CR, AS Koivuniemi, S Thongpang, JC Williams, and KJ Otto. Evaluation of micro-electrocorticographic electrodes for electrostimulation. Proceedings of the 31st Annual IEEE EMBS International Conference, 1:5510-5513. 2009.

    Vitae, CR, DC Martin, and KJ Otto. Intracortical polymerization of poly(3-4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT). IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering (in preparation).

  • Publications

    “You Know Nothing of My Work: (Mis)Reading Philip Roth and Woody Allen.” Philip Roth Studies 9.2 (2013).

    "The Bellarosa Connection and the Limits of Limitless Memory.” Saul Bellow Journal 25.2 (2013)."

    “Remembering the American Century: The Danger in Arthur Miller’s Danger: Memory!” [Inter]sections 16.4 (2011).

    “Woody Allen and the Golden Age of Kitsch.” NeoAmericanist 5.2 (2011).

    “What’s the World for If You Can’t Make it Up: Making and Remaking Morrison’s Jazz.” Journal of South Texas English Studies 2.2 (2011).

  • Presentations

    List the presentations and papers you have presented at conferences and other events. Make sure you include:

    • Title of your presentation
    • Conference name
    • Conference location and date
  • Presentations

    Vitae, CR and KJ Otto. In vitro characterization of activation and deactivation of iridium oxide stimulating microelectrodes for cortical prostheses. Indiana Health Industry Forum Conference - Innovention 2007. 2007. Indianapolis, IN.

    Vitae, CR, SM Richardson-Burns, and KJ Otto. In vitro characterization of iridium oxide and PEDOT stability for chronic microstimulation. Neural Interfaces Conference. 2008. Cleveland, OH.

    Viate, CR, AS Koivuniemi, S Thongpang, JC Williams, and KJ Otto. Micro-electrocorticographic electrodes for stimulation neuroprostheses. Proceedings of the 20th annual Biomedical Engineering Society. 2009. Pittsburgh, PA.

  • Papers, Presentations, and Panels

    “Nostalgia and Regret in Bellow’s ‘Cousins.’” American Literature Association, Boston, MA, May 2013.

    “I Wonder if You Remember at All: Frame Narratives in Bellow’s Short Fiction.” American Literature Association, San Francisco, CA, May 2012.

    “The Holocaust Framed and Renamed: Two Narrative Strategies to Remembering.” EGAD Conference, College Station, TX, April 2012.

    Chair, “The Posthumous Releases of William Styron,” American Literature Association, Boston, MA, May 2011.

  • Skills

    This section is optional, and usually not included unless you have earned prestigious awards relevant to the position.

     

    Awards

    These may include laboratory skills, foreign language ability, computer skills and others.

  • Skills

    Laboratory

    • Electrochemical data collection and analysis
    • Neural recording and stimulation techniques
    • Electrode coating techniques (conductive polymers and iridium-oxide)

    Hardware

    • National Instruments data acquisition equipment
    • Tucker-Davis Technologies (TDT) signal processing systems
    • Autolab Potentiostat/Galvanostat instrumentation for electrochemical experimentation
  • Awards and honors

    Passed MA Comprehensive Exam in English with Distinction, Spring 2011

    Unanimously awarded “Passing with Distinction” at Thesis Defense, Spring 2011

    Received Ken’s Incentive Scholarship for Writing, Spring 2010

    Dean's List four consecutive semesters, 2006-2008

    Received Liberal Arts Award for Academic Excellence, 2007-2008

    Member of Phi Eta Sigma, Sigma Tau Delta, Alpha Chi, and Golden Key International Honor Society

Resume & CV Resources

Brainstorm Experience

The purpose of your resume is to get an interview. In thirty seconds or less, most employers decide whether or not to consider applicants for employment, so your resume's content must be CLEAR, CONCISE, and COMPELLING.

Begin the resume writing process by jotting down every position or experience you've had. Here's a nice list of example experiences to help you brainstorm:

  • Organizations to which you've belonged
  • Leadership positions
  • Volunteer experiences
  • Special class projects
  • Awards
  • Languages you speak
  • Computer skills
  • Special interests or hobbies
  • Travel/study abroad
  • Anything else significant

keep in mind: Not all of your experiences are likely to be included in your final version, but a running list can help you craft and tailor a resume for any opportunity.

 

Then, break down each position you held into the core 4:

THE CORE 4Example #1Example #2Example #3
Company Name Mochas & Javas Purdue Science Student Council Silver Cross Hospital
Position Held Barista Treasurer Volunteer
Month/Year of Start & Finish January 2011 - May 2013 January 2013 - December 2013 May 2010 - August 2010
City & State/Country Austin, TX West Lafayette, IN Joliet, IN

 

CREATE TRANSFERABLE SKILLS 

Now that you have listed your experiences, begin contemplating the TRANSFERABLE SKILLS you gained. Doing so will give you an idea of how the skills you obtained will make you competitive for future opportunities.  

Common TRANSFERABLE SKILLS employers are looking for include:

  • Communication
  • Critical thinking
  • Creativity
  • Organization
  • Decision making
  • Adaptability
  • Thinking ahead
  • Calculating numbers
  • Quick Learner
  • Confidence
  • Energetic
  • Helpfulness
  • Trustworthiness
  • Efficiency
  • Listening
  • Dependability
  • Flexibility
  • Time management
  • Trouble-shooting
  • Punctuality
  • Loyalty
  • Precision
  • Resourcefulness
  • Leadership
  • Analysis
  • Customer service
  • Motivating others

 

WHAT IS THE NEXT STEP? 

Take one of your experiences, list the TASKS you performed in that job and identify which TRANSFERABLE SKILLS might line up with those tasks. For example, if you were a barista, your task and transferable skills list might look something like this: 

TASKSTRANSFERABLE SKILLS
Took money and gave change back to customers, deposited the day’s earnings in bank, closed out a day’s paperwork Calculate numbers, dependability
Wiped tables, cleaned up after customers at end of shift Efficiency
Opened store at 5:30 a.m., finished daily duties before end of shift Punctuality, time management
Worked well with co-workers, trained new employees Leadership, communication, helpfulness
Listened to customer orders and concerns, made quick decisions, got drinks out in a timely manner even though it was really busy, memorized multiple menu items Customer service, listening, decision making, precision

 

Now you have the ingredients to MAKE A STRONG BULLET POINT

MAKE A STRONG BULLET POINT

Now it’s time to incorporate those TASKS and TRANSFERABLE SKILLS you gained into strong bullet points for your resume by implementing the following formula:

 

POWER VERB + TASK +

PURPOSE (why did you do the task?),

METHOD (how did you go about doing the task?), or

RESULT (what happened because you did it?)

 

HINT:  You can include a combination of two of these add on items (for example: purpose and method) in a bullet point. You can even include all three (purpose, method and result) if you are able to! 

 

HOW CAN THIS FORMULA BE IMPLEMENTED?

 

PURPOSE

  • Observed and analyzed students’ behavior in order to guide successful classroom instruction
  • Performed gear mapping for transmissions to optimize shift patters, fuel economy and available power 
  • Collaborated with Purdue faculty to increase cultural self-education amongst minority students

 

METHOD

  • Ensured customer satisfaction by listening to orders and delivering product that fulfilled customer specifications
  • Collected quantitative infrared imaging using a high speed infrared camera

 

RESULT

  • Developed new ideas for Exelon’s eFin website which increased traffic flow by 20%
  • Performed internal audits on 159 underwriting cases in 3 weeks improving efficiency according to the Audit Board
  • Designed and implemented latches for condensation vents to reduce water leakage creating a safer work environment

WHAT IS A POWER VERB?

action verbs

FIRST DRAFT, FIRST STEPS

Decide the RESUME TYPE you prefer to use, based on the message you want to portray to employers:

 

Chronological:

  • Highlights information in reverse chronological order from most recent to oldest
  • Most commonly used format 
  • Make the most of this resume type by prioritizing your sections, so you can highlight your most relevant experience first! 

Functional:

  • Highlights information in categories based on commonly grouped skills
  • Useful for those with a wide variety of work history, gaps in experience, or those seeking to change career fields

View the CCO Handbook for functional resume examples

 

FORMAT PROFESSIONALLY

  • Margins: Top-0.8”-1”; Sides and bottom-0.5”-1”
  • Font Size & Style: 10-12 and simple, readable fonts (Calibri, Georgia, Arial, Cambria, Times New Roman)
  • Length: Undergraduate level-1 page; Graduate & PhD-2 pages or more; Education, Nursing and Medicine can have more than 1 page
  • Templates: Refrain from using them!
  • Order: Heading, objective (if included) and education are first, in that order
  • No Pronouns: Do not use first-person pronouns (I, me, my) 
  • Don't get Personal: Refrain from incorporating personal information like your age, gender, religion, political affiliation, marital status, ethnicity , visa status or photographs

Check this section out from your tablet or desktop computer to view our interactive resume tool!

EDIT & PROOFREAD

  • Organize your experience sections so that your most relevant experience Is listed towards the top of your resume.
  • Don’t include your references or a “References available upon request” statement on your resume. Remember that the purpose of your resume is to get an interview and an employer typically asks for references during or after an interview. 
  • Take out your high school education and experience unless it directly relates to the position you’re applying for. 
  • Visit the CCO in Young Hall, Rm 132 for a RESUME CRITIQUE during Drop-Ins from 10-4, Monday– Friday! 

 

Check this section out from your tablet or desktop computer to view our interactive CV tool!